3 Day Attorney Review: How Long Does The Process Take in New Jersey Real Estate Transactions?

Navigating the world of real estate transactions can be a complex task, particularly in New Jersey where the laws and processes may differ from other states. One such unique aspect is the ‘three-day attorney review period’, a critical phase that plays a pivotal role in the successful completion of any real estate transaction.

Whether you are buying or selling property, understanding the attorney review process can help you avoid pitfalls and expedite the transaction. But, how long does this process take? And more importantly, why is it necessary?

In New Jersey, the attorney review process is not just a formality but a legal requirement designed to protect all parties involved. Given its significance, it’s crucial to have an experienced real estate attorney by your side throughout this journey.

Understanding the Attorney Review Process

The attorney review process is a critical stage in any real estate transaction in New Jersey. It’s a time when both the buyer’s and seller’s attorneys review the contract of sale, raise concerns, negotiate changes, and ensure that their client’s interests are adequately protected. Having skilled New Jersey real estate attorneys is essential to navigate the complexities of the attorney review process and mitigate potential risks.

What is the Attorney Review Process?

The attorney review process begins once both parties involved in a real estate transaction sign a contract of sale. This contract, often prepared by a realtor, outlines the terms and conditions of the property sale. Once signed, the attorney review period commences.

The attorney review period typically lasts three business days, although it can be extended if both parties agree. During this time, the attorneys for the buyer and seller will carefully examine the contract of sale. They will scrutinize every clause, looking for any terms that could pose a risk or disadvantage to their client. Having a skilled attorney during this process is crucial to mitigate risks and ensure a smooth transaction.

If either attorney identifies problematic clauses or terms, they will issue an ‘attorney review letter’ to the other party’s attorney. This letter will outline the proposed changes or deletions to the contract.

Key Terms: ‘Attorney Review Period’ and ‘Attorney Review Addendum’

Attorney Review Period

The ‘attorney review period’ refers to the specific timeframe during which attorneys can review and propose changes to the contract of sale. In New Jersey, this period typically lasts three business days from the date the contract is signed. However, weekends and legal holidays do not count toward these three days.

It’s important to review the mortgage commitment during the attorney review period to ensure that the terms and requirements outlined are favorable and protect the buyer’s interests.

It’s important to note that during the attorney review period, either party can cancel the contract for any reason. Also, the period can be extended through mutual agreement, allowing more time for review and negotiations.

Attorney Review Addendum

An ‘attorney review addendum’ is a document that outlines modifications to the initial real estate contract. If an attorney identifies terms or clauses that could be detrimental to their client, they will propose changes through an attorney review addendum.

The addendum details the suggested modifications, deletions, or additions to the original contract. The other party’s attorney then reviews these proposed changes. If both parties agree to the changes, the addendum is incorporated into the contract, and the transaction proceeds based on the revised terms.

Why is the Attorney Review Process Important?

The attorney review process serves as a safety net for both buyers and sellers in a real estate transaction. It ensures that all contractual terms and conditions are fair and equitable, preventing any party from being disadvantaged.

Given the financial magnitude of real estate transactions and the complexity of real estate law, having an experienced attorney like Kristen E. Johnson, Esq., can help safeguard your interests. With her expertise spanning various areas of New Jersey real estate law, she can navigate the attorney review process with competence and confidence, ensuring a smooth and successful real estate transaction.

How the Attorney Review Period Begins

The attorney review period is a critical juncture in any New Jersey real estate transaction. But when does this period start, and who initiates it? Let’s delve into the details.

When Does the Attorney Review Period Start?

In the context of a real estate contract, the attorney review period begins once both parties – the buyer and the seller – have signed the contract of sale. This document, typically prepared by a realtor or real estate agent, outlines the terms and conditions of the property sale. It includes details such as the agreed-upon price, the closing date, and any contingencies that must be met before the transaction can be finalized.

Once the contract of sale is fully executed – that is, signed by all parties – it is delivered to the respective attorneys for review. This moment marks the start of the attorney review period.

when does NJ attorney review start?

It’s worth noting that the attorney review period typically lasts three business days from the day the contract is signed and delivered. However, weekends and legal holidays do not count toward these three days. Also, the period can be extended if both parties agree to it.

The Role of the Real Estate Agent

While real estate agents play a crucial role in many aspects of a real estate transaction, their involvement in initiating the attorney review period is particularly significant.

To begin with, the real estate agent is usually responsible for drafting the initial contract of sale. They use their knowledge of the property and the buyer’s and seller’s desires to craft a document that reflects the agreed-upon terms of the transaction.

Once the contract of sale is prepared, the real estate agent presents it to both parties for signatures. After obtaining these signatures, the agent delivers the signed contract to the attorneys representing the buyer and the seller, thereby initiating the attorney review period.

In essence, the real estate agent acts as a conduit between the buyer, the seller, and their respective attorneys, ensuring that the contract of sale is delivered promptly and the attorney review period begins without delay.

The Role of the Seller’s and Buyer’s Attorney

In the attorney review process, both the buyer’s and seller’s attorneys have distinct roles to play. Their primary duty is to protect their respective clients’ interests, ensuring they are not disadvantaged in any way.

Seller’s Attorney

The seller’s attorney reviews the contract of sale to ensure it accurately reflects the terms agreed upon between the seller and the buyer. They confirm that all legal descriptions of the property are correct, the financial terms are as expected, and any contingencies are reasonable. If there are any potential issues, the attorney will propose changes through an ‘attorney review addendum.’ The seller’s attorney also coordinates with the title company to handle title searches, provide title insurance, and ensure all title-related matters are clear.

Buyer’s Attorney

Similarly, the buyer’s attorney scrutinizes the real estate contracts to safeguard the buyer’s interests. They verify the purchase price, closing date, and any contingencies such as home inspections or mortgage financing. The attorney also ensures that the contract provides ample time for the buyer to secure financing, conduct inspections, and complete any other necessary due diligence. Conducting a title search is crucial during this review to uncover any potential issues related to the property’s ownership and ensure the title is clear of liens or encumbrances.

Both attorneys continue to negotiate until they reach common ground, after which the revised contract is accepted, and the transaction can proceed.

The Importance of an Experienced Real Estate Attorney

Given the complex nature of real estate transactions and the high stakes involved, having an experienced real estate attorney is invaluable. They not only possess the knowledge and expertise to navigate the intricacies of real estate law but also have the negotiation skills to advocate effectively for their clients.

Kristen E. Johnson, Esq., for instance, brings over 20 years of experience in various areas of New Jersey real estate law to the table. Whether you’re dealing with foreclosures, condominium law, landlord-tenant issues, or residential and commercial real estate, Kristen’s extensive experience and nuanced understanding of the law make her an asset during any real estate transaction.

The Purchase and Sale Agreement in the Review Process

The purchase and sale agreement, often referred to as the contract of sale, is the cornerstone of the attorney review process. This legal document outlines the terms and conditions agreed upon by the buyer and seller, including the purchase price, closing date, and any contingencies that must be met before the transaction can be finalized. Once both parties sign this agreement, it triggers the start of the attorney review period.

During the attorney review process, the purchase and sale agreement is meticulously scrutinized by the buyer’s and seller’s attorneys. They examine every clause and provision to ensure their client’s interests are adequately protected. Any potentially problematic terms or conditions are flagged for negotiation. For instance, the buyer’s attorney may verify that the contract provides sufficient time for home inspections and securing financing, while the seller’s attorney will confirm that the financial terms and property descriptions are accurate.

The Attorney Review Clause: What it is and why it matters

In New Jersey real estate, the ‘attorney review clause’ holds significant weight. But what exactly does this term mean, and why does it matter in a real estate contract?

The attorney review clause is a provision in the purchase and sale agreement that allows both the buyer’s and the seller’s attorneys a designated period, typically three business days, to review the contract. During this time, the attorneys can approve, disapprove, or suggest modifications to the contract. Importantly, until this review period expires, either party can cancel the contract without any penalties.

With the attorney review clause, both parties have the opportunity to have their respective attorneys go over the contract in detail, identify any potential issues, and negotiate changes if necessary.

How Attorney Review Works

Here are the stages of the attorney review process and how a seasoned real estate attorney like Kristen E. Johnson, Esq., can help mitigate common challenges.

Step 1: Initiation of the Attorney Review Period

The attorney review period begins once both the buyer and seller sign the purchase and sale agreement. This contract outlines the terms of the transaction, including the agreed-upon selling price, closing date, and any contingencies. The attorney review clause in this contract allows for a period, typically three business days, during which either party’s attorney can disapprove or suggest changes to the contract.

Step 2: Examination of the Purchase and Sale Agreement

During the review period, the attorneys for both parties meticulously examine the purchase and sale agreement. This includes checking the accuracy of property descriptions, ensuring financial terms reflect the agreed-upon conditions, and verifying reasonable contingencies. Any potential issues are flagged for negotiation.

Step 3: Negotiation and Finalization

If there are any proposed changes or disagreements, the attorneys negotiate until they reach common ground. Once all parties agree to the revised contract, the attorney review period ends, and the transaction proceeds as planned.

Potential Issues and Resolutions

Common issues that may arise during the attorney review process include discrepancies in property descriptions, unrealistic contingency periods, or unclear financial terms. Experienced real estate attorneys like Kristen E. Johnson, Esq., leverage their expertise to identify and resolve these issues effectively. They ensure that their client’s interests are protected, making necessary adjustments to the contract and negotiating favorable terms.

When and How the Attorney Review Concludes

Typically, the attorney review period ends three business days after both the buyer and seller have signed the purchase agreement. However, this timeframe can extend if either party’s attorney suggests changes or disapproves of the contract. The conclusion of the attorney review period is marked by mutual agreement on the revised contract, indicating that all potential issues have been addressed to everyone’s satisfaction.

As a seasoned real estate attorney with over 20 years of experience in Monmouth and Ocean County, New Jersey, Kristen E. Johnson, Esq. knows exactly what to look for during this critical period. Her expertise spans various areas of New Jersey real estate law, allowing her to identify and address potential issues effectively.

Post Attorney Review: What’s Next?

Once the attorney review period has concluded, the real estate transaction progresses to the next stages. It is important to obtain title insurance at this point to protect both the buyer’s and lender’s interests in the property. These stages include home inspections, appraisals, title searches, and securing financing, among others. Both parties must fulfill any contingencies outlined in the contract before proceeding to the closing date.

For example, the buyer might need to secure a mortgage loan, while the seller may need to carry out agreed-upon repairs. If all goes well, the transaction moves to the final phase – the closing, where the property ownership officially transfers from the seller to the buyer.

Navigating these subsequent stages can be complex, which makes having an experienced real estate attorney like Kristen E. Johnson, Esq. invaluable. Kristen’s vast experience and expertise ensure that her clients are guided through each step of the process, protecting their interests at all times.

The attorney review period ends with mutual agreement on the revised contract, paving the way for the next stages of the real estate transaction.

Final Thoughts About Attorney Review And New Jersey Real Estate Transactions

Understanding the attorney review process and its significance in New Jersey real estate transactions can greatly simplify this journey.

The attorney review process is not just a formality; it’s a critical phase that ensures fairness, transparency, and protection for all parties involved. It provides an opportunity for the buyer’s and seller’s attorneys to meticulously examine the purchase agreement, ensuring that all terms are fair, beneficial, and in compliance with New Jersey laws. This process can identify potential issues, negotiate better terms, and ultimately protect your interests.

Having an experienced real estate attorney like Kristen E. Johnson, Esq. to guide you through this process is invaluable. With over 20 years of experience in Monmouth and Ocean County, New Jersey, Kristen’s expertise spans across various areas of New Jersey real estate law, including foreclosures, condominium law, landlord-tenant law, and residential and commercial real estate. Her deep understanding of local real estate law and her dedication to her clients make her an exceptional ally during real estate transactions.

Call  732-477-4921 or Contact Us for a New Jersey real estate attorney consultation

Author

  • Kristen Johnson, Esq

    With over two decades of legal experience, Kristen E. Johnson, Esq. has been serving the Jersey Shore community. As the owner and principal attorney of her NJ real estate law firm, Kristen specializes in residential and commercial real estate. A Monmouth County native, Kristen is deeply rooted in the community. She holds degrees from Drexel University ('00) and Villanova School of Law ('03). Her expertise spans various areas, including foreclosures, Condominium Law, Landlord-Tenant matters, and residential and commercial real estate. Kristen's commitment to the field extends to education, as she also operates the Ocean School of Real Estate as a licensed educator.

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